Improving Cash Flow with Invoice Factoring and Purchase Order Financing

Managing cash flow can be a challenge for many businesses. But creative funding options like invoice factoring and purchase order (PO) financing can make the job much easier.

These financial solutions offer convenient, cost-effective and immediate access to working capital. Invoice factoring and purchase order financing are suitable for companies in just about any industry. They can provide financial support to expand, manage business surges or even meet day-to-day operating expenses. And they’re ideal if your company is newer and can’t obtain a loan.

The Ins and Outs of Invoice Factoring

Invoice factoring is easy to set up and terminate. To qualify, you should have no existing primary liens or claims on your accounts receivable. And you must have creditworthy clients who pay their invoices promptly and in full.

When factoring customer invoices, you can receive quick cash advances often within 24 hours. Your cash advance is based on the overall value of the invoices you provide as collateral. Typically, you can get 80 percent of the invoice value upfront and the remaining value after your client pays the invoice minus a three to five percent factoring fee.

Your customers pay the factoring company directly. And the factoring company takes responsibility including any loss for the collection of their debts. It’s important to note that invoice factoring is not a loan, so there are no repayments to make. You are simply using the good credit of your clients to release your own assets to be put back in your own business.

Historically speaking, factoring is a well-established form of business financing that produces cash payments at the time of shipping, delivery and invoicing. Its origin has been traced to the days of the Roman Empire or even earlier, but the U.S. factoring industry dates back only about 200 years to the early nineteenth century. Factoring companies, known as factors, evolved from U.S. selling agents for European textile mills. Currently, about 70 percent of the volume of traditional factors is still in textiles, apparel and related industries that highly value credit guarantees, according to the Commercial Finance Association.

Invoice factoring can provide the working capital your business needs to handle new projects, fill large orders and pay creditors on time or even early. In essence, factoring can keep your cash flow running smoothly while your business grows. This can enable you to stop worrying about finances, and concentrate on productivity and how to profitably expand your business. Factoring also can help you avoid wasting time tracking down accounts receivable or handling bad debts.

Here are some other important factors (no pun intended) about invoice factoring:
– There is no application or set up fee.

– You choose which accounts to finance.

– Invoices eligible up to 30 days from the date of invoice.

– There is no a minimum funding requirement or requirement to factor all invoices.

– The funds wired directly into your bank account.

– Customers send their checks directly to our lockbox.

Cashing in on Purchase Order Financing

PO financing can provide quick cash flow reserves for manufacturers, importers, exporters and distributors. This type of short-term funding is used to finance the purchase or manufacture of specific goods that have been presold by the client to its credit worthy end customer. Funding involves issuing letters of credit or providing funds that allow companies to secure the inventory they need to fulfill customer orders.

With PO financing, working capital financing is protected by a security interest in existing purchase orders and the proceeds of the purchase orders. Normally, the security interest is perfected by the lender taking possession of the inventory or raw materials.

PO financing can pay for the cost of your goods directly to your supplier, freeing up cash for other critical business expenses. This can help your company ensure timely deliveries to customers, grow without increased bank debt or selling equity, and increase market share. To qualify for PO Financing, you must provide financial information about your company, information about your buyer and supplier, and buyer and supplier invoices.

PO financing is available for finished and non-finished goods, although finished goods are generally easier to finance. Finished goods involve transactions where the goods go directly from your supplier to your buyer. You never touch them or take direct possession.

Non-Finished Goods are when you, the seller, take possession of the goods either in a raw state (such as yarn to make blue jeans) or a semi-finished state (partially sewn blue jeans). In either case, you must take possession of the product.

Purchase order financing can help solve a variety of cash flow dilemmas. Here’s a prime example: Your suppliers want you to pay cash on deliver (C.O.D.) and your buyers want to pay you net 30 to 60 days. You have no cash flow during manufacturing, while the goods are in transit, and until your invoices are paid.

PO financing may be right for your company if…

– You need additional working capital.

– You lack expertise to handle the financing.

– You need a quick response to an immediate sales need.

– You don’t want to incur additional credit risk, be it foreign or domestic.

– You want your buyers and sellers to not know each other.

– You want the opportunity to make additional profit.

Purchase orders can be used for U.S. and foreign buyers and suppliers. Consider this scenario involving a U.S. supplier and U.S. buyer: You’re an apparel manufacturer. You’ve been in business for six years and have a good profit and loss statement and balance sheet. You just received a large order and are maxed out on credit from your suppliers. Your sales price to your buyer is $100,000 and your total cost to produce the goods is $75,000. Your gross margin is 25 percent. The financing company will purchase the goods for you from your supplier, give you 45 days to produce the goods, charge you a 5-percent purchase order fee ($5000, 5 percent of $100,000) and factor your receivables.

The Cautionary Tale of Shakespeare’s Macbeth

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William Shakespeare’s Macbeth contains a lot of life lessons. Number one: Don’t listen to stranger bearded women when wandering through a fog. Number two: Never let anyone bully you into doing something you don’t want to, even if it’s your wife. And Number 3? If you want to become king, the kill-everything-in-your-path strategy, while seemingly effective, is bound to backfire.

Macbeth is indeed a cautionary tale of greed, power and ambition. At the play’s core, it is about humanity’s tendency for evil and ruthlessness, particularly when fueled by the desire for ascension. Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman fresh from a ruthlessly victorious battle, stumbles upon a pack of prophesizing witches who imply that kinghood is in his future, effectively messing with his head and ego. Just a few little words set Macbeth in motion to achieve his fate of being king, instead of letting things unfold naturally.

Looking at Macbeth summary, Macbeth stands somewhat as a tragic hero and a villain in the play, as he is a man whose ambitious ego and thirst for power sets him on a path of destruction that inevitably arrives at a grisly destination with his head on a spike. Violent is as violent does for Macbeth.

What we learn from Macbeth, aside from the whole downside in embarking on a murderous rampage, is that our desires and our emotions control us much more than we think. It also highlights how easily swayed humanity can be at times, when all it takes is some eerie women to plant a seed of power in our impressionable egos. At its basic level, Macbeth is about the power and drive of man, and how that power and drive can effortlessly steer us off course. Take, for example, a selection from Macbeth quotes featuring the hallucinations of Macbeth that finally convinces him to kill the king. A floating mirage of a dagger, “a dagger of the mind” he calls it, seals the deal for Macbeth, reading it as something to “marshal’st” him on his way to power. Note the level of agency he ascribes to this image, which could either be a manifestation of the witches or of his “heat-oppressed” brain. The image is both a sign and a usher of sorts for Macbeth, suggesting his own lack of agency and self-determination that allows him to be easily swayed. A helpful comparison in understanding Macbeth’s craziness can found in another famous Shakespearean play where a tragic hero is conflicted with inaction, uncertainty and of course, impressionability when it comes to the supernatural. In the Hamlet summary, Hamlet is directed on a path to avenging his late father by his father’s ghost. He wavers and flip-flops on what to do-much like Macbeth-until finally committing the first murder (Poor Polonius!) that gets the ball rolling. For him, as for Macbeth, the first murder is always the hardest, but it gets easier with next few. For Macbeth, it gets excessively easier.

The tendency to be impressionable-either by one’s own mind tricks or the biting word from Lady Macbeth or the witches-makes Macbeth vulnerable to his own impulses of greed and power and the subsequent implication for evil. It’s also what makes him appear partly as a tragic hero, someone whose flaws of initial weak sense of self allows him to be a plaything of fates and witches. Those reading Macbeth as a tale of power and greed must also take into consideration how such ambitions are essentially weaknesses for Macbeth, as he fails prey to his own flaws. A cautionary tale indeed.

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Invoice Factoring: Cash Now, No Waiting, No Debt – Your Competitor Is Doing It, Are You?

What are Your costs for NOT Factoring?

Consider the time value of money and the benefits of improved cash flow to your business. By having, cash for your invoices within 24 hours are you able to pay your suppliers faster and receive better discounts. Are you able to fulfill your next order to XYZ Company and make payroll without tapping your line of credit at the bank? Can you offer longer terms to larger customers and attract more business? Can improved cash flow help your business grow or survive without incurring more debt at the bank? Can the financial benefits of improved cash flow to your business offset the fees of Factoring, and then some? Sure it can, the savings alone in taking discounts from your vendors can equal the cost of Factoring. All the other savings are in your pocket! Factoring is a smart business decision. Why are you doing it?

Is Cash needed immediately for growth or survival?

Is long billing cycles putting a strain on your business cash flow? Despite increasing sales, does the management of receivables and payables seem like a juggling act? Could your business increase sales by offering better terms to your new and larger customers? Are you spending too much time collecting from slow paying customers and not enough time building your business? Is your bank turning you down for traditional financing due to years in business, profitability, lack of assets, personal guarantees or financial strength?

Have you considered turning away new business due to slow cash flow?

These are challenges many businesses face that can be solved with Factoring.

Benefits of Factoring Receivables

Simplicity

The advanced funding you receive for your receivables and the discount fees you will pay are based solely on the financial strength and credit worthiness of your customers, not your business!

You receive Cash for your unpaid accounts receivable invoices. Usually the factoring company buys the invoice from you for an amount less than its actual face value (70-90%). When the Factor later collects the full amount of the invoice from your client, you will receive the remainder of the advance less the factoring fee (discount rate). Fees will vary depending on the total dollar amount you intend to factor on a monthly basis.

Flexibility

Need a flexible financial solution that can help your business be more competitive while improving your cash flow, credit rating, and supplier discounts? Factor as much as your want or as little as you want. You decide. No obligations. There are No minimums and No maximums in the amount you can factor. No binding contracts, if that is what you want.

Unlike traditional bank financing, factoring relies on the financial strength and credit worthiness of your customers, not you. Here’s why you should use Factoring services:

Offer Better Terms – Win More Business

With Factoring, you can attract more business by offering better terms on your invoices. Most companies negotiate on price to win business in a competitive market, but with Factoring, you can negotiate with terms instead of price.

To your customers, better terms can be more attractive than better prices.

When using attractive terms to win business, you can build the cost of factoring into your costs of good and services.

Example: A new customer may choose to do business with your company because you can offer NET 30 or NET 45 terms while your competitor (who isn’t factoring) requires payment up front but has a 3% better price. If you factor the subsequent invoice at a discount of 3%, you have leveraged factoring services to win the business at no extra cost and improved your cash flow at the same time.

Improve Cash Flow * NO Additional Debt *WIN over customers

Your Business Receives:

* Get cash in 24 hours or less from your outstanding invoices! Eliminate long billing cycles.

*No new debt is created. Factoring is not a loan. This allows you to preserve your financial leverage to take on new debt. Improved credit rating.

*Purchase capital equipment to expand your business.

* Increase inventory for quicker shipments or handle seasonal inventory needs.

* Market for additional business.

* Take trade discounts. This alone can offset Factoring fees and all the other savings are gravy!

* Pay off nagging, expensive delinquent obligations.

* End payroll worries.

* Meet tax requirements on time. No more exhaustive penalty fees.

* Negotiate discount purchasing.

* Unlimited sales and profit potential.

You Receive:

*Cash stability

*Simple to start and use

*You keep control

* Reduce stress, improve planning, focus on what is critical to make money.

Customer Credit Services:

*Reduce bad debt expense, work with experts at collecting.

* Streamline credit approvals for new customers.

* Improve decision-making on new business.

* Reduce administration costs: long distance calls for collection and credit investigation, postage, staff, monthly statements and more.

* Larger customer credit lines and better terms, which increase sales.

* As you grow, your payroll budget for credit and collection department is minimal.

Accounts Receivable Management:

* Reduce administrative costs. Factor will post invoices and apply cash applications.

* Improve customer relationships. You are no longer the bad guy looking for payment.

* Improve receivable turns. Fact: Customers pay Factors before independent businesses.

* Improve accounting performance; timely reports, online access and more.

* Redirect your critical resources to marketing and production

If you are looking to receive an increase in cash flow and increase your bottom line profits, you need to factor your invoices now!

Please feel free to reprint this article as long as the resource box is left intact and all links are hyperlinked.

www.brtfinancial.com/arecfac.htm

6 Facts About Oil Paint

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1. The earliest known paintings that were done in oils date back to the 7th century BC. These paintings were Buddhist murals that were discovered in caves in Western Afghanistan. Oil paint didn’t become widespread for use in art works until the 15th century, when it became popular throughout Europe. Jan van Eyck, a 15th century Flemish painter, is widely believed to have invented it, though in reality he did not invent it, instead he developed it.

2. Oil paint is credited with revolutionising art. One of its key properties is that it’s very slow to dry. It gave artists a lot more time to work on their paintings and it allowed them to correct any mistakes they might have made. Oil paints allowed for artists’ creativity to flourish more because artists could devote more time to each painting. Many of the most widely praised paintings were done in oils.

3. For a few centuries artists had to store their oil paints in animal bladders. This was because the paint tube wasn’t invented until 1841. It was invented by John Goffe Rand, an American painter. Before the tube was invented, artists would have to mix their paints themselves before painting. They would have to grind the pigment up themselves, then carefully mix in the binder and thinner.

4. The most basic type of oil paint is made up of ground-up pigment, a binder and a thinner, which is usually turpentine. For the binder there are lots of different substances that can be used, including linseed oil, walnut oil and poppy seed oil; each of these gives the paint different effects and has different drying times.

5. There are modern versions of oil paint that can dry a lot more quickly than the standard version. The way that it dries is not by evaporation, but by oxidation, the process where substances gain oxygen. It is generally accepted that the typical painting done in oils will be dry to touch after about two weeks, though it can take six months to a year before the painting’s actually dry enough to be varnished.

6. Oil paint is very durable and tough, so it’s used as a finish and protector. It can be used on wood and metal and in both cases, it can be used internally as well as externally. It’s often applied to wood during building construction and can be found on metallic surfaces on things like planes, bridges and ships.

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What is Invoice Factoring and Invoice Discounting?

The Romans were the first civilization to sell promissory notes at a discount, beginning the industry of factoring. America was built largely on the possibilities of factoring, when colonial businesses were factored by Europeans willing to invest cash in exchange for the promise of large returns, and government bonds also use the same principles applied by businesses when they engage in invoice factoring.

Invoice factoring is, at its simplest, the sale of the right to collect cash owed on your outstanding invoices. Most businesses engage in invoice factoring when they need cash up front quickly, or when they have customers that are slow to pay and don’t have the resources to build an accounts collections department. Though some companies are large and established enough to get accounts receivable financing through a regular bank, it can be handy to have access to invoice factoring companies as well.

Most businesses use invoice factoring to get fast cash. In the intense and fast paced business environment of today, ready cash can be invaluable. With the sale of your invoice futures, you can get the cash today you need to capture customers that will move your business forward.

Invoice factoring is not a loan; rather, it’s an outright sale of an asset. Another way of looking at it is as a cash advance: you give up a certain portion of the money you expect to receive in the future in exchange for ready cash today. While some businesses purchase invoices outright, others give you a down payment toward the invoice, paying you the balance less their fee when they receive payment from the customer. One of the best things about invoice factoring is that your credit has no bearing on whether you are approved; instead, your customer’s credit qualifies the invoice for factoring.

Many different industries take advantage of invoice factoring, including:

  • Transportation
  • Manufacturers
  • Distributors
  • Wholesalers
  • Staffing and consulting firms
  • Telecommunications companies
  • Service providersBecause ready cash is so important in their business, industries that are heavily vested in human services and need to be able to meet payroll are among the best able to leverage invoice factoring. However, any business that generates at least ten thousand dollars in accounts receivable should be able to use invoice factoring, provided they’ve acquired creditworthy customers.

    Other situations that might make invoice factoring a wise choice for you include:

  • A young company with creditworthy customers, but not sufficient credit history for your own business to be considered creditworthy by banks
  • A company with the necessity of taking advantage of new, time-limited sales and profit opportunities, but inadequate cash flow currently to do so
  • Companies with income, credit, or tax problems
  • Companies that have filed for bankruptcy, but that stand to turn a profit
  • Companies that are growing too rapidly for ready capital to keep up with business needs
  • Companies poised to grow very soon but do not want to incur debt
  • Companies that are growing rapidly, but do not have good enough credit to take out bank loans.
  • Start-up companies with no capital base currently
  • Companies with seasonal sales patterns or uneven sales patterns

Who Survived at the End of Lost?

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The final season of Lost was split up into two realities. One was a continuation of the main timeline from the first five seasons. This timeline is the “real world” and it’s this world that this article is focused on. The other reality is the “flash sideways” which is revealed to be a kind of “purgatory” (I don’t know if that’s the best word for it, but it’s some sort of “post life” world) at the end of the finale episode.

The “flash sideways” world occurs in a place outside of time. It happens after all of the characters die, even if they die at different times (which they obviously do.)

But this article is about who survived at the end of the “real world” timeline as the show ends? Who either escaped the island for good or was still alive on the island at the end?

Escaped The Island On The Plane

The first group of people who clearly survived were those who were on the plane flown by Frank Lapidus. Sawyer, Kate, Claire, Miles, & Richard were on the plane as passengers.

Survived On The Island

Hurley was the “new Jacob” at the end of the series (after Jack’s death) with Ben as his “#2.” Bernard and Rose were also still alive (avoiding drama!)

Desmond was also alive on the island at the end of the series but it is implied that he leaves to join his wife (Penny) and his son (Charlie) because Ben tells Hurley he doesn’t have to do things the way Jacob did (people can leave the island.)

And I don’t want to forget Vincent the dog (who so poignantly visits Jack as he’s dying at the end.)

Other Survivors

Walt, Aaron, Penny, Jin & Sun’s baby, and Eloise Hawking are some other characters from the show who are still alive at the end.

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Receivables Factoring: An Easy Way to Free Up Cash from Unpaid Invoices

If your business is facing cash flow challenges, account receivables factoring may be the ideal solution to the problem. With receivables factoring, you sell your accounts receivable or invoices to generate quick cash. Receivables factoring is a common practice that’s been used for centuries by businesses around the world to manage cash flow. In fact, receivables factoring transactions in the United States, alone, exceed $60 billion per year, according to the Commercial Finance Association.

Benefits of Receivables Factoring

There are a number of benefits to receivables factoring. A major reason is that it gives you the ability to immediately access cash owed to your company. For some businesses, this minimizes the need to incur debt for operations while waiting for invoices to be paid.

Another advantage of factoring is that it provides a smoother, more consistent cash flow. Instead of wondering if or when you will receive payment from your customers, you can accurately predict when you’ll receive payment based on the terms of your relationship with the receivables factoring company. Businesses typically must wait 30, 60, or even 90 days to receive payment on invoices for products or services that have been delivered. During this time, these funds are tied up and inaccessible to the business. However, receivables factoring can eliminate long billing cycles and enhance cash flow.

Also, factoring eliminates the need for you to handle your own collections. Factoring companies are run by professionals who specialize in collecting and tracking invoices. This translates into an overall reduction in the amount of bad debts and fewer headaches for your business.

Receivables factoring can give you access to cash within 24 hours, which can help you effectively meet short-term cash flow crunches. It also can help you:

o Accelerate cash flow, making it easier to make payroll, pay taxes and fulfill new orders.

o Offer better terms to large customers and increase sales.

o Extend credit to large customers without asking for COD.

o Pay your suppliers faster; take advantage of early pay discounts.

o Purchase equipment, inventory and supplies.

Qualification for Receivables Factoring

Just about every type of industry that generates commercial invoices can and does use receivables factoring. In general, if you pay for labor or materials prior to receiving payment from your customers, factoring can help your business. Or if your business is growing faster than you can generate additional working capital–from private sources or from a bank–factoring can probably provide the cash you need for steady growth. Also, if you have a fairly new business that can’t qualify for bank financing, factoring may be ideal for you.

To qualify for receivables factoring, your company will have to meet to two basic conditions. There can be no existing primary liens on your invoices, meaning no other company should have a claim on the payments when they come in. Also, your customers must also be creditworthy. The factoring company will evaluate your customers on the basis of how quickly they’re likely to pay their invoices.

Prime Candidates for Receivables Factoring

Is your business a prime candidate for receivables factoring? Receivables factoring may be the perfect solution if:

o Long billing cycles are putting a strain on your business cash flow.

o You’re spending too much time collecting from slow paying customers and not enough time building your business?

o The bank has denied your request for a traditional loan because of your lack of years in business, profitability, assets or overall financial strength.

o Your business could increase sales by offering better terms to your new and larger customers.

On the other hand, receivables factoring may not be a good fit if your business is running on low margins–less than 10 percent. Receivables factoring also won’t make sense for your business if you have ample working capital and cash flow isn’t a problem.

How It Works

With receivables factoring, you essentially liquidate or sell outstanding invoices to a factoring company to receive immediate working capital. The company buys the invoice from you for a cash advance amount slightly less than face value, and then later collects the full amount when the receivable is due. Once the factoring company receives full payment for the invoice, you’ll receive the remaining amount–minus a fee. Generally, the receivables factoring fee amounts to three to five percent of the invoice value.

Factoring companies have different fee structures, but factoring fees typically involve:

o Advanced funding – When you send in an invoice to be factored, you’ll usually receive 70 to 90 percent funding of the invoice amount within 24 hours after the invoice has been verified. Then the advanced funding is wired to your business bank account.

o Discount rate or factoring fee – The factoring fee can range between 2.5 percent and 3.5 percent per 30 days, or .1 percent for every day the invoice is unpaid after factoring. (Factoring fees can be customized to the individual needs of your business and customer base.)

o Remainder of the advance minus the factoring fee – When your customer pays the invoice, you will receive the remainder of the advanced funding, minus the factoring fee or discount rate.

Here’s an example of how receivables factoring works. Suppose you have a customer XYZ Company, which owes your business $100,000 for a shipment of your gadgets that were just delivered. XYZ Company is a large customer that has good credit, but they never pay their suppliers (you) any sooner than 45 days. Instead of waiting 45 days to receive payment for your $100,000, you decide to take advantage of receivables factoring. The factoring company verifies your invoice to XYZ Company and you receive 80 percent of the $100,000 ($80,000) within 24 hours, wired to your bank account.

If you have a discount rate similar to the one previously given and XYZ Company pays the $100,000 invoice in about 45 days, this equals a factoring fee of 4.5 percent of the original $100,000 ($4,500). Since you have already received an advance of $80,000 from the factor, you’ll receive the remaining $20,000 minus the factoring fee of $4,500 ($15,500). Ultimately, you’ll collect $95,500 of the original $100,000 invoice.

Keep in mind that the percentage charged by a receivables factoring company is generally more than you would pay for a short-term commercial loan. For that reason, factoring is best used to generate quick cash–not as a long-term solution. Also, receivables factoring companies make their money based on the volume of invoices they purchase. So you may have a slightly harder time finding a factoring company if you have invoices less than $10,000.

Top Review of Brig Hart

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This whole system seems crazy to me.

“The MonaVie opportunity and the R3 Global Total Support System to achieving better health and wealth.” Sounds a little crazy don’t you think? I say it is. But again, don’t want to upset anyone, it’s just my opinion.

The MonaVie product is claiming to be number one as a supper food? Brig Hart said these words himself. Who, by the way is an excellent speaker. Humble though isn’t he? MonaVie is a wine like substance, in a wine like bottle that you are to sell to your friends and family.

You will be offering the business opportunity and product to others through the follow acronym: The ITS factor, (Invite, taste and share.) “Make a list of every one you know every where…” Sounds familiar doesn’t it? Let me tell you something, If you are anything like me your reputation with friends and family for testing crazy products and programs on them is pretty bad. The last thing I ever do at this point is try to push or sell stuff to them. They know where to find me if they see me working on something that interests them.

$39.00 to get involved. Then you have the “right” to be able to buy a case of the product again, bottles of some sort of wonder wine at a wholesale price. Then you get signed up on an “AS” (auto ship) so they can continually ship you cases of this stuff. Anything like AA? (Alcoholics anonymous) You buy the MonaVie wine-like product at $32.00 each and then unload it at like $45.00 a piece.

I don’t know, didn’t people catch on to this kind of thing with Am Way years and years ago? At least that was regular products you could use every day or that regular people bought like toilet paper and T.V.s and such.

This system brings back terrifying memories of a drinkable goopy green Aloe Vera gel that I sold with Nutrition for Life. My poor mom still has some of that stuff in a box in the basement along with some other pills and stuff. Sorry mom.

I just can not support Brig Hart or this MonaVie product and selling system. Imagine trying to get people to come over to your house, drink some mystery drink and then actually buy it! THE END.

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Small Business Factoring – Remedy For Cash Flow Problems

When starting out as a business owner, no doubt you considered all the aspects of owning and operating a business. One neglected area of business ownership is cash flow. Neglected that is until the business owner realizes outstanding billed invoices are not being paid in a timely manner and ongoing operations can’t be funded since the necessary cash flow is not coming in as expected. What is the solution for a new business or one that does not have enough established credit to get a line of credit from the bank?

Small business factoring is one solution that offers quick access to cash collateralized by your own accounts receivable or outstanding invoices. First. let’s consider the situation and how cash flow problems came about in the first place. Generally, invoices are sent to customers with Net 30 terms, meaning the balance of the invoice should be paid by the customer within 30 calendar days. As many business owners know, seldom do their customers pay within a 30 day time frame with many going unpaid for sixty days or more. Odds are, your customer is experiencing the same cash flow problems as you, their vendor.

So how can small business factoring be a solution for cash flow problems which plague small and mid-size business? Invoice factoring can provide much needed cash within days rather than weeks for your business. This type of business funding is simple in methodology. For example, once a business supplies goods or a service to a customer and an invoice is generated for the total amount due, rather than sending the invoice to the customer, the invoice is sent to a factoring company.

The factoring company will take the invoice and evaluate the financial worthiness of your customer and if they meet the factoring company’s guidelines, they will send you, the business owner, a check for about eighty percent of the total value of the invoice. The other twenty percent of the outstanding invoice is held in reserve until the invoice is paid in full. Once the invoice is paid, the factoring company will send you another check for the remaining twenty percent less their fee.

The small business owner receives needed cash to operate his business within a few days allowing him to continue operating unencumbered by cash flow shortfalls. The factoring company assumes the risk of collecting the outstanding invoice and collects a fee from the total amount of the invoice. Small business factoring is an excellent solution for cash flow problems affecting your bottom line.